Upcoming Webinar: Distributed Control for Improving Power System Stability

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Upcoming Webinar: Distributed Control for Improving Power System Stability

By | 2018-04-05T18:05:50+00:00 April 5th, 2018|Distribution Grid Integration, Energy Storage, Grid Integration, News|Comments Off on Upcoming Webinar: Distributed Control for Improving Power System Stability

On April 12, 2018 at 1:00 p.m. ET, Sandia’s David Copp will present an IEEE Smart Grid Webinar: “Distributed Control for Improving Power System Stability.”

Power systems consist of many components distributed across wide geographic areas. A sudden increase or decrease in load or generation in these systems results in swings in power transfer between regions, called inter-area oscillations. Damping these inter-area oscillations is crucial for maintaining a secure and reliable power grid. In this webinar, David will present distributed control schemes that can be used to improve the small-signal stability of large power systems. Implementations include the modulation of power transfer along a High Voltage DC transmission line, as well as injecting real power from distributed energy storage devices. This presentation will show results from several example power systems including the western North American Power System. It will also discuss practical challenges arising from using remote measurements for feedback signals, characterize the time delays associated with synchrophasor-based measurements, and highlight the effect time delays have on stability of the distributed control system.

Register

 

David is currently a Post-Doctoral Appointee with Sandia National Laboratories’ Energy Storage department, where he performs analysis and develops algorithms for integrating energy storage into the electric power grid. He received a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona. He received a M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of California at Santa Barbara, where he was a member with the Center for Control, Dynamical-Systems, and Computation. His broad research interests include control, modeling, analysis, and simulation of nonlinear and hybrid systems with applications to power and energy systems, multi-agent systems, robotics, and biomedicine.