SAND 2012-0752 P

/Tag:SAND 2012-0752 P

Research Challenge 6: Beyond Spontaneous Emission

This research challenge explores radiative processes that go beyond incoherent emission. For example, although LEDs (based on spontaneously emitted incoherent light) are presently thought of as the source of choice for white light generation. However, coherent light sources have many potential benefits, including ultra-high efficiency, narrow linewidths, improved directionality of light, and the potential to [...]

By |February 3rd, 2012|Comments Off on Research Challenge 6: Beyond Spontaneous Emission

Research Challenge 5: Enhanced Spontaneous Emission

Our explorations focus on two nanophotonic approaches for modifying the emission environment: controlling the photonic density of states (photonic crystals) and introducing intense localized electromagnetic fields (surface plasmonics). Both approaches require integration of emitters with dielectric, plasmonic, or photonic crystal cavities, which we accomplish through nanofabrication and epitaxial growth (photonic crystals, fabricated metallic structures), chemical [...]

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Research Challenge 4: Defect-Carrier Interactions

This research challenge aims to develop an in-depth understanding of the electrical, optical and structural properties of defects in InGaN materials and heterostructures. With such understanding, routes to circumventing a key contributor to nonradiative carrier recombination might be realized, helping to overcome the blue-efficiency, RYG-gap, and functional-light technology challenges. Measured density of an InGaN [...]

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Research Challenge 1: Nanowires

This research challenge explores the synthesis and properties of GaN/InGaN nanowires as a materials architecture for visible light-emission. If nanowire devices could span the entire visible spectrum, the RYG-gap technology challenges would be overcome. In addition, such full-spectrum emission would enable chromaticity-tunable light, which could also impact so-called smart (or higher functionality) lighting, another technology [...]

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Research Challenge 3: Competing Radiative and Nonradiative Processes

This research challenge aims to develop a microscopic understanding of the competing physical processes that determine light-emission efficiency of InGaN materials and heterostructures. With such understanding, new routes to ultra-high light-emission efficiency at all current densities and all across the visible spectrum might be realized, thus overcoming the blue-efficiency and RYG-gap [intlink id="8173" type="page"]technology challenges[/intlink]. [...]

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Research Challenge 2: Quantum Dots and Phosphors

Phosphor in powder form. (KLuTa2O7: Eu3+) This research challenge is aimed at studying materials architectures suitable for SSL wavelength down-conversion. Particular materials we have focused on in this research challenge are Eu3+-doped phosphors and group II-VI semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). Among the principal criteria for such wavelength down-conversion materials are a high [...]

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Our SSLS EFRC’s Scientific Research Challenges and Publications

The Solid-State Lighting Science (SSLS) Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) works to advance the scientific foundation that underlies current and potential-future SSL technology, and to ultimately enable significant advances in the efficiency with which SSL is produced and used. We do this through the seven scientific research challenges:  one is what one might call [...]

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Solid-State Lighting Technology: Current State of the Art and Grand Challenges

The graphic on the left shows the anatomy of a state-of-the-art white solid-state lamp; and the graphic on the right shows in the black curve the spectral power density of the light that it emits. The lamp is basically a blue LED coated with green and red phosphors. Some of the blue light leaks through [...]

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