Ken Armijo-1_(web)Sandia’s Kenneth Armijo (in the Photovoltaic & Distributed Systems Integration Dept.) was recognized in Hispanic Engineer and Information Technology magazine’s Fall 2014 issue as a “top professional in energy” in their article, “Where Does the Energy Sector Find Its Next-Gen Stars?”

Dr. Armijo is a research scientist who holds a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley with minors in Energy and Resources, and business credentials in Management of Technology from Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. Dr. Armijo also received a Masters in Science in Mechanical Engineering from Berkeley. Currently, he is completing his PostDoc and is a Research Associate with Sandia.

Dr. Armijo’s current work consists of spectral derates phenomena of single, and multijunction devices, arc-fault plasma reliability physics, thermal phenomena of photovoltaic (PV) technologies and inverter/power-electronics reliability research. His Ph.D. research investigated the development of heat pipes for enhancing the efficiency and waste energy recovery of solar-PV technologies. Ken conducts PV systems R&D for different high-impact applications to develop cost-effective, reliable PV energy systems and accelerating PV technology integration in the US and globally.

Solar spectral information is necessary for accurate photovoltaic (PV) performance forecasting, especially for large, utility-scale PV installations. Due in part to commercial spectrometers’ high cost, globally (and for the US) this spectral data is limited. Ken’s research investigates PV spectral derate phenomena and how atmospheric composition and variability impacts PV performance. His research also involves developing a novel, low-cost sensor capable of highly accurate wide-band spectral measurements.

Solar spectral information is necessary for accurate photovoltaic (PV) performance forecasting, especially for large, utility-scale PV installations. Due in part to commercial spectrometers’ high cost, globally (and for the US) this spectral data is limited. Ken’s research investigates PV spectral derate phenomena and how atmospheric composition and variability impacts PV performance. His research also involves developing a novel, low-cost sensor capable of highly accurate wide-band spectral measurements.

A recipient of several prestigious national fellowships from NASA, the National Academies of Science, the National Science Foundation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and GEM, Dr. Armijo has and continues to use his scholarship experiences, as well as his research experience with NASA Johnson Space Center, Sandia National Laboratories and Stanford Linear Accelerator Center to educate youth in the sciences.

Ken’s research and professional interests are in alternative energy technologies and sustainability, as they pertain to innovation, business, and policy. He currently holds three patents on a broad range of technologies; has published over twenty publications and has had three startup companies in wireless infant/elderly health monitoring systems, solar water heating technologies, and in organic sustainable agriculture. He is also a board member in multiple national STEM-education organizations, where he has previously facilitated various science, energy and sustainability education projects and programs throughout New Mexico and California.