Energy and Climate

 

Sandia researcher Cy Fujimoto demonstrates his new flexible hydrocarbon polymer electrolyte membrane, which could be a key factor in realizing a hydrogen car.

Sandia researcher Cy Fujimoto demonstrates his new flexible hydrocarbon polymer electrolyte membrane, which could be a key factor in realizing a hydrogen car.

Sandia has the expertise in synthesizing and characterizing ion-containing separators employed in fuel cells and electrolysers.  For the past 12 years, Sandia has developed and patented a novel class of poly(phenylene)s that has shown promise in both acidic and alkaline fuel cells, flow batteries and electrolysers. Sandia has received industry investment totaling over $6M through work-for-others (WFOs), Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs), and licensing investments.  In 2013, Sandia developed an alkaline separator in a fuel cell that maintained low resistance over 300hrs, while a popular candidate failed after only 100hrs.  The Sandia alkaline separator technologies show a long-term durability (greater than 2000 hrs.) as an electrolyser separator, compared to 800 hrs obtained by a commercial standard.

 

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