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New Book Highlights Pressing Need for Hydrogen-Powered Vehicles

Sandia National Laboratories’ Lennie Klebanoff says he feels a personal responsibility to inform technical readers and the public about the urgent need to get zero-emission hydrogen technology into the nation’s vehicles and other carbon-producing applications. (Photo by Dino Vournas)

Sandia reveals the breadth of its hydrogen fuel expertise in the recently published Hydrogen Storage Technology—Materials and Applications. Sandia researcher Lennie Klebanoff (Hydrogen and Combustion Technologies Dept.) is confident that the book will give readers a sense of urgency about the need to get zero-emission hydrogen fuel cell vehicles on the road, and to get other hydrogen-based power equipment into the marketplace.

Klebanoff, who serves as the book’s editor and co-wrote half the chapters, was director of the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence, one of three DOE Hydrogen Storage Centers of Excellence dedicated to solving the problem of storing hydrogen on automobiles. This Center, competitively selected and funded through the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), included 21 partners from industry, academia, and national laboratories from 2005 through 2010.

Klebanoff drew upon the considerable hydrogen expertise at Sandia/California to complete the book. Sandia’s Daniel Dedrick (Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program Manager), Terry Johnson (Energy Systems Engineering and Analysis Dept.), and Vitalie Stavila (Hydrogen and Combustion Technologies Dept.) each contributed to various chapters, and now-retired Sandia hydrogen program manager Jay Keller co-wrote a pair of chapters as well. “It was a real team effort and clearly shows the level and breadth of hydrogen knowledge here at Sandia,” Klebanoff said.

In addition to the Sandia authors, 21 others contributed, including authors from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and from other countries including Canada, China, and the United Kingdom. “I felt strongly it was important to have an international perspective, as our energy issues are global and interconnected,” said Klebanoff.

Read the Sandia news release.

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